Courses

This is an overview of ArtScience courses given this Academic Year, subject to the ‘ArtScience Courses of Choice’ stated in the curriculum. Some courses are mandatory for students of certain years, which is mentioned at the course description. All courses are open for students of the Bachelor as well as the Master programme, unless the course is full.

CASS Exchange Workshops are part of the exchange weeks (two weeks after the Autumn Break and two weeks after the Spring Break) between the Creative Departments of the Royal Conservatoire (Composition, Sonology and ArtScience), where all departments offer courses accessible to all of their students.

Master Primers are courses on a higher theoretical level. They are focused on our Master students. Bachelor students can attend, though they should realise the level. In cases of a limited allowed number of students to a Master Primer course, Masters will have priority over Bachelors.

Alternate Perspectives / The Alternate Perspective Machine
Ars Electronica
Art in the Making / Feedback Systems
Art & Philosophy</>
BioPUNK!
Catching the Light
European Affairs 4: Caen Caen
Hardware Barriers and Software Eyes: Security and Spatial Design in Software Culture
How to Write for Everything
Inner World Out
Internet Art
Introduction to ArtScience
Introduction to Electronics
Introduction to Optics
Introduction to Programming
Int(r)o Projection
Invisibility, Invasiveness and the Uncontrolled. Tackling Social Issues with Scent
Lighting Design for/as Performance
MAX/MSP
MetaMedia
Movement Matters 3.0
New Arts & Music Theory
‘Pataphysics
Patterns of Ebb and Flow
Presentation as Performance
Pro Projection</>
Quick & Dirty
RecPlay
Redeconstruct Media
Sensors, Actuators & Microcontrollers</>
Simplicity and Complexity
Sound == Image
SoundWorlds
SoundWorlds 2: Sounding Space, Spacing Sound
Spectra – Space as an Organism III
Studium Generale
Tension Machines II: Sound
The City as Performative Object
The Four Ecologies
The Materiality of Sound
The ‘Other’ Senses
Time as Matter
Transient Spaces
We Are Compost. Multispecies Storytelling in the Age of the Anthropocene
Writing as/in Research



Alternate Perspectives / The Alternate Perspective Machine
Renske Maria van Dam
Mandatory for: free choice (Master Primer)

Technological machines exist, of course, but there are also social machines, aesthetic machines, theoretical machines and so on. In other words, there are territorialized machines (in metal, electricity, etc.) just as there are also deterritorialized machines that operate on a completely different level of semiotization.’
Felix Guattari (Molecular Revolution in Brazil)

Early 20th century Russian painter-architect El Lissitzky started to use axonometry to eliminate all reference to the spectator’s point of view. Liberating the viewer from gravity, he hoped, would lead to foundering of the whole system of perception and our established ways of looking upon the world.  Almost a century later, following contemporary media, we can see  signs of the world’s center of gravity literally shifting. Migration, globalization and digitalization question Western/Europe’s centrality.  We will explore alternatives to dominant Eurocentric discourse and reconsider our own habits. From alternate cultural (African, Eastern and Western) perspectives to minor paradigm shifts in perception, language and disciplines this course trains you to ‘liberate your point of view from gravity’.  Philosophically, embodied and artistically we look upon the world from multiple perspectives at the same time. Theory in this course is considered to be a creative practice. Inspired by literature research you are challenged to put your thoughts into action. At the end of the course you are asked to present your own ‘alternate perspective machine’. For more information or literature overview contact Renske Maria.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To shift the bias from the Western cultural discourse into a wider perspective.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Ars Electronica
Robert Pravda, Taconis Stolk, teachers from MediaTechnology (Leiden University)
Mandatory for: B1, M1

Excursion to the Ars Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria: one of the most prominent festivals of new media art in the world.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: excursion of approx 4 days
Objective:: To get a first contact with the context of the ArtScience realm and to get to know your fellow students.
Examination: attendance



Art in the Making / Feedback Systems
Marion Tränkle
Mandatory for: free choice

This workshop engages in system thinking and specifically focuses a lens on feedback systems, observing their occurrences in everyday life. It is a mixture between a reading course and an observational research lab.
We will take a broad theoretical approach, looking how feedback systems are conceptualized in systems theory and digital design and take a sidestep into political theory. What differentiates the different types of feedback systems and what are their implications? How to couple action and function through feedback and feedforward?
The observations we will undertake look into the circularity of everyday situations navigating urban environment and/or digital ecologies. How to detect and analyze feedback systems and how to reason about cause and effect?
Requirements:
This course requires reading and reflecting, as well as observational skills and an analytical eye. The willingness for active listening and giving feedback to others is vital. Assignments will be part of the course structure.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop deeper insight and skills in the artistic possibilities of feedback systems.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Art & Philosophy
Rob van Gerwen
Mandatory for: B1

Philosophical questions typical for interdisciplinary arts are just like those asked about the arts, traditionally so-conceived. Only with an interdisciplinary art, these questions tend to be more complicated and intertwined. Working from examples, we delve into the philosophy of art in an effort to understand what artscience is, or what it might be.
We look at questions such as: What is artistic material, what should happen for material to become artistic? How does something become a work of art? How do we find out what a work means—how can we discuss about such meanings: isn’t it all very subjective? How may we experience a work in the most fruitful manner—can someone teach you to discern something in a work which you failed to notice on your own? How can art forms be distinguished from each other, and why is it important to think about this? What are the differences between art and real-life, between art and science? Students are challenged to make a work with these questions in mind.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain basic understanding in philosophical issues when making art.
Examination: attendance, assignment



BioPUNK!
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: free choice

BioPUNK!
…is informed by and illustrates the tenet that the next revolution – the only one that really matters – will be in the field of biology. Forget physics and chemistry; they are only tools to probe living matter. Computers? Merely simulators and modelers for life. The cell is King!
Since the succesfull and provocative KABK/xFac Project “Genetisch Ontwerpen” in 2003, much has changed in the scientific field of biology. A whole set of issues has arisen from the avalanche of new biological discoveries and revolutionary medical techniques as well as from a new understanding of the fundamental processes of life. There are certain area’s we need to rethink, or at least, review, so we gain a better understanding of why our beleaguered society responds so hesitantly to these developments.
The ArtScience division Art & Fiction (AF) introduces the pilot project BioPUNK!
With this pilot, we hope we can contribute to the ethic, aesthetic, social, economic and scientific developments of this complex and exciting research area.
Listen to Your Mitochondria!

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop an artistic position towards phenomena as contemporary biology and bio art.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Catching the Light
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: B1

A work of art does not often come to its maker mysteriously like a visionary dream or out of nowhere and already worked out. And even when this happens it remains a question how to continue from there? In normal circumstances, the best ideas come while fiddling around, but how do you fiddle constructively?
An important aspect of the craft of artists working in any medium is sketching; how to generate ideas and how to draw consequences from them. Sketching can be a method of recording or prototyping an idea but it is also a powerful tool for discovery. The process of sketching enables you to deepen a thought, explore a fascination or playfully engage with elements that open up new directions in a work. It is a method to find things that you would never have found otherwise.
In this (edition of sketching methods) workshop we will be working with light exclusively. With an array of light techniques, integrated in various configurations, we will observe and explore different qualities of light such as glint’s, emanations, flicker and other phenomena that occur in and out of our setups. Light itself is immaterial so we need tools to ‘catch’ it. Instruments and materials that enable us to control and compose with the projected light. Following a number of simple steps, the tools will give insight about the light phenomena that are explored, and provide ideas for further development and experiment. These steps involve observation and investigation as much as mental-projection and decision-making. Therefore, documentation and recording of the process is an important aspect of the workshop. Recording your process does not only help you in making decisions, it also enables you to learn more about your personal preferences and working methods.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain basic skills concering the creative process in the widest sense.
Examination: attendance, assignment



European Affairs 4: Caen Caen
Kasper van der Horst, Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: free choice

In the series European Affairs, we travel to a foreign city to collaborate with local students and to develop work based on the local contaxt. After Belgrade (Serbia), Kraków (Poland) and Budapest (Hungary) we will visit a Western European city — Caen, Normandy, France.

Please note: This course exists of two seperate parts. It is not possible to follow only one part of the course. The international excursion will be costing a yet unknow amount for travel and stay.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours in semester 1 plus an international excursion of approx. 1 week in semester 2
Objective: To develop a perspective on local context to develop (site-specific or locally inspired) work.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Hardware Barriers and Software Eyes: Security and Spatial Design in Software Culture
Dani Ploeger
Mandatory for: free choice

Over the past few decades, camera surveillance of public space has steadily increased in most parts of the global north, while more recently, physical barriers have been installed around many prominent and politically sensitive places in response to terrorist attacks. In this two week course, we will examine the political, technological and aesthetic aspects of these instruments of control in relation to digital culture and critical media practices.
The course will consist of three components: We will engage with relevant theoretical perspectives on surveillance technology, security and space, by thinkers including Hannah Arendt, Guy Debord and Michel Foucault. We will also walk through the centre of The Hague to explore various kinds of security- and surveillance-related infrastructures, building on psychogeographical practices proposed by the French Situationist International movement in the 1960s and 70s. These two parts, thinking and walking, will then form the basis for practical work in digital art, combining self-made 3D scans of objects in public space with game development and video editing.
No prior knowledge of software or programming is required, as the course will include basic introductions to all the software we will use. You will need to bring your own laptop though.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain artistic insight in the role of surveillance in contemporary society.
Examination: attendance, assignment



How to Write for Everything
Ine Poppe
Mandatory for: B3

As the Professional Practice Preparation course of ArtScience, this week offers specific training in writing, focusing on how to write clearly about your work for grant applications, catalogues and to sponsors and press.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn practical professional writing skills.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Inner World Out
Martijn Engelbregt
Mandatory for: free choice

The student develops an inner-world self-diagnosis instrument to manifest a bite-sized self-portrait of the outside world with the help of internal kung fu.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop insight in one’s own (artistic) decision mechanism in order to get more grip in personal artistic processes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Internet Art
Jan Robbert Leegte
Mandatory for: free choice (CASS Exchange Workshop)

The Internet is not only the central media for art discourse, art (re)presentation and artistic research, most of all the Internet is a progressively dominant influence on art itself. The web and the accompanying tradition of Internet Art is about 25 years old and offers a powerful and relevant playing field to add to the aspiring artist’s praxis.
In this course we will take a dive into a short history, look at existing artistic methods, the post-digital condition and how it can be used in visual but also sound art.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain insight in the internet as an artistic medium.
Examination: attendance, assignment


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Introduction to ArtScience
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B1, M1

This course is an introduction to important developments through the history of the arts that are important to the ArtScience domain. Five approaches to interrelate selected art works will be presented in class. The presented works range from realized and unrealized artworks to concepts. The five approaches are chosen in such a way as to trigger discussion and reflection both on existing works and your own work.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: 2 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain basic contextual understanding of the ArtScience domain.
Examination: attendance, participation



Introduction to Electronics
Lex van den Broek
Mandatory for: B1

This is a general introduction to working with electronics. It consists of three introductory classes. After those you are expected to finish your first electronic patch in individual appointments with Lex van den Broek.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 2.5 hours plus individual appointments
Objective: To gain fundamental skills in how to build electronic circuits for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Introduction to Optics
Leandros Ntolas
Mandatory for: free choice (CASS Exchange Workshop)

During this course you will be introduced to a very fundamental, but very complex thing: light. Through the study of optics and through hands-on experimentation, the main properties of light will be explored and analysed, along with the basic tools involved when dealing with it. Also, the basics of visual perception and the human visual system will be presented.
For the ‘output’ part of this course, you will be asked to actively engage in the observation of light in your environment for the days that the course lasts, and to attempt to utilise what you learned and observed into creating something interesting using some property(-ies) of light; be it a sketch for an artwork, a simple light experiment, or something completely different.
There is the possibility that one of the days of the course–if the weather conditions allow it–we will move the course outdoors, and go for a small field-trip. First stop will be the work ‘Celestial Vault’ at Kijkduin, by the American artist James Turrell, and second stop will be the beach of the Hague (possibly at Zandmotor), where we will delve into the fascinating world of atmospheric optics ( aka light interacting with the atmospheric elements of nature).

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain fundamental skills in the workings of optical physics.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Introduction to Programming
Jeroen Meijer
Mandatory for: B1

This is an introductory course into computer programming, using the Python language. After following this course, students will have a basic insight into computer programming and will know where to start creating digital prototypes for future projects that involve interaction, image, sound, video, networks and electronics.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of computer coding for artistic use.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Int(r)o Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: B1

The intention of this course is to experiment in a playful way with projection in relation to your work. Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. Also shadow and coloured light can be interpreted as projection.
As an assignment, you will be asked to make a projection design that connects with your own work and/or ideas.
keywords: •projecting on objects •surfaces •live playing •how to use audio signals •no-source •feedback video •minimal projection •ganzfeld projection •we’ll also briefly look into how tv’s, videorecorders and analog video mixers work.
For students who followed an earlier projection course, there will be some new topics to look into, such as video mapping, high quality projection and the use of the more advanced digital video mixers that combine analog and digital image sources.
Due to the available amount of equipment, there’s a limited number of students that can enrol.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of projection for artistic experiments.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Invisibility, Invasiveness and the Uncontrolled. Tackling Social Issues with Scent
Klara Ravat
Mandatory for: free choice

Scent is a powerful medium, it triggers memories and has a strong influence in people’s behaviours and choices. We know that, but what are the inner material and physical properties of scent? What is so special about it? Taking as a departing point the phenomenology of smells we will navigate together and find ourselves dismantling our society and building fragranced weapons. Smells good? Maybe not.
Invisibility, invasiveness and the uncontrolled, these three materialistic attributes sound like a perfect match to design a social revolution! How can we better communicate about injustice? Can we create a capitalist resistance via scent? Can we self-design social weapons with it? Or can we create a scent with a global signifier? Or simply inform population about minoritarian issues?
With this course we aim to explore pressing social challenges, we will imagine and create new solutions and we will rethink the value of our own artist practice, all through scent.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To (practically and theoretically) learn about olfactory art and its possibilities to address social issues.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Lighting Design for/as Performance
Katinka Marač
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to give an introduction to the theory and practice of lighting design and handling basic stage equipment. We will explore how meaning can be created using the exceptional possibilities of the medium light and how lighting design can be deployed in / as performance. During the course we’ll trace back the origins of lighting design in contemporary performance, by looking into the work and compositional methods of renowned American artists from the sixties and seventies and some of their contemporary predecessors as Xavier le Roi. In the seventies artists as Robert Rauschenberg and members of the New York based Judson group shared a keen interest in working at the intersection of (dance) performance, visual art and art & technology. They drastically changed (theatrical) performance, and the role of set and lighting design, freeing it from its former supportive role and incorporating them as equal elements in, or as starting points for performances. The course is set up as a creative lab. We’ll start with a short introduction in the various elements of a lighting design, including types of light, angles and colour and an introduction to technical aspects such as patch board, dimmers and the lighting board. We’ll research how lighting design can be used to create, structure and alter content, space and time and will work on lighting design as performance.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 8 hours
Objective: To master theory and practice of basic lighting design for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



MAX/MSP
Johan van Kreij
Mandatory for: free choice

An introductory course to MAX/MSP(/Jitter). MAX, MSP and Jitter form a graphic programming environment specifically developed for artistic use.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of MAX/MSP.
Examination: attendance, assignment



MetaMedia
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B1

A work of art does not confine itself to an object, a picture or a sound composition. Especially not in the 21st century, where all kinds of communication technologies and strategies can be used to compose the context of art, or even to create works in disciplines and using methods that were never explored by artists before. In this course, students are given a theoretical and practical framework on how to compose concepts and context. Approaching contemporary art as a conceptual communication model opens possibilities for unusual works of art and a critical attitude towards traditional artistic paradigms, but it also creates a framework for students to develop new and effective strategies for a professional creative position in a media world. Students will create their own metamedial works during the course.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop a more abstract view on possibilities of artistic expression using media that are not normally used in an artistic manner.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Movement Matters 3.0
Cocky Eek, Renske Maria van Dam
Mandatory for: free choice

We do not move through space but space moves through us. MOVEMENT MATTERS is a two week hands-on course to explore the Japanese concept Ma, best translated as ‘gap’, ‘difference’ or integrated space-time. In the West space and time are understood as the empty distance between two objects or moments. Space-time in Japan is understood as a single charged field, a dynamic spatiotemporal interval. In two weeks we will revisit the exhibition Ma: Espace Temps du Japon as originally imagined by Japanese architect Arata Isozaki and presented in 1978 in museum Les arts decoratifs in Paris. In collaboration with Japanese fine artist, dancers and musicians Isozaki presented seven ways to address Ma in art and design.
In this course we will work on a new version of this transdisciplinary exhibition/experience by connecting it to our own context and interests. We will work individually as well as collectively towards a public presentation at TUDELFT on October 11th. Prepare to be fully committed during the two weeks. Classes from 10.00-16.00 including preparation in evenings or/and on Wednesdays. For more information (for example original exhibition catalogue) contact Renske or Cocky.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop new artistic visions on space.
Examination: attendance, assignment



New Arts & Music Theory
David Dramm (KC), Gabriel Payuk (KC), Eric Kluitenberg et al
Mandatory for:

This course is offered to all first-year students of ArtScience, Composition and Sonology. It provides a cross-disciplinary exploration of recent ideas, practices and techniques in music and related arts: verbal, visual, theatrical, and much else. New forms of creative practice and new platforms for its presentation are investigated, ranging from the conventional concert hall to the alternative spaces of galleries, installations, site-specific composition, the internet, etc. The relationship and the “fit” between new forms of thought and new forms of presentation will be a recurring topic throughout the course, as will the challenge of writing about such new media in the face of an evolving and still-developing critical language that attempts to avoid irrelevant criteria from past art forms.

Credits: 3 ECTS
No. of classes: approx 24 classes of 2 hours
Objective: To gain knowledge on recent theories and ideas in music and related arts and sciences.
Examination:



‘Pataphysics
Matthijs van Boxsel
Mandatory for: free choice

Morosophers are people with an evidently absurd theory about existence. Unlike the mediocre theories of New Age gurus, astrologers, ufologists and so on, morosophical studies are so queer that they cannot help acquiring a literary quality. The most important criterion of morosophy is originality: the less predecessors and followers, the greater the chance of being included in my book. The word morosophy [fool-osophy] means: foolish wisdom or wise foolishness. Morosophs operate at the crossroads of science, religion, art and madness. Is the earth flat? Was Dutch spoken in paradise? Are atoms spaceships? Is Delft Delphi? Can the floor plan of the pyramid of Cheops be found in the street plan of ‘s-Hertogenbosch? Is the world entering the Lilac phase? Did abstract thought commence when the clitoris evolved from the inside to the outside?
As a rule, a morosopher is somebody whose world has been destroyed by a shocking event. With the help of his theory he managed to reconstruct a new universe from the wreckage, for the sake not of a higher truth, but of an endurable existence. Morosophers are not dreamers; they are healthy thanks to a phantasm within which they are lord and master. To the extent that they bother to follow scientific insights, this is to stimulate their fantasy. Unimpeded by any scientific knowledge, their imagination enables them to force their way through to the world of science and technology. From there they design a parallel universe in which the limits of the possible are sought out and transgressed; they enter the area of the wondrous and the monstrous, and discover a world that, like the world of the comic and the fairy-tale, is out of the reach of the physicists. Morosophy is science in wonderland.
Matthijs van Boxsel will be giving lectures and a workshop on ’Pataphysics, the Science of Imaginary Solutions. ’Pataphysics feeds on metaphysical subjects, scientific discoveries, art and cabaret. The French writer Alfred Jarry (1873–1907), who developped the science of sciences, conceived a brain-washing machine, Perpetual Motion Food, and computed the surface of God.
’Pataphysics was at the root of futurism, dadaïsm and surrealism, but has since developped in the Oupeinpo (Ouvroir de peinture potentielle): it analyses the pre-existing constraints, and investigates new forms of potential creations within the arts.
On the one hand we will develop imaginary islands, languages, calenders etc.
On the other we will be looking for the pataphysical dimension of everday life by means of simple interventions: ’Pataphysics being the science of the exception.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn to think and act ‘pataphisically.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Patterns of Ebb and Flow
Cocky Eek, Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: free choice (CASS Exchange Workshop)

This whole week you’ll reside on a relatively young sandy strip of land of Almere beach, along the IJ-Lake where we will specific zoom in on nocturnal phenomena. Can the “wild” elements like wind, water and sand be composed into a work? At the end of the week the outcome of your work/sketches will be presented to small dedicated audience of Almere. This week is on an opportunity to experience to work with the natural elements, while being part of the process and to sense that everything is in continual movement.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To create artistic projects in the context of tidal movements in nature.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Presentation as Performance
Hilt De Vos
Mandatory for: free choice

In this workshop you will learn how to use your body and voice as communication tools for performance and presentation. How does an audience perceive you as a human being on stage. What role does your body play in communication. What tone of voice will work best in a given context and.. how to overcome anxiety and a possible nervous breakdown.
To reach these goals we will do exercises to effectively use your body and voice, while remaining yourself on stage.
The format is master class which means the focus is on the individual but is also a collective learning experience.
PLEASE NOTE: however called ‘masterterclass’, this course (like other courses) is available for Bachelor as well as Master students.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain insight and develop skills in physical presence in presentations.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Pro Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: free choice

The Pro Projection course is aimed at students who are planning to use some form of projection in their work.
Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. In this very hands-on and practical course we’ll explore these aspects considering the projects or ideas that the students bring in individually.
We ‘ll explore how different technical resources are best put to use and what impact that could have on the experience of the work. This might result in some radical alternatives to the original plan!  We‘ll try out and test a lot so that a high level of precision can be reached.
Hopefully in this way we’ll put the original ideas into an enriched perspective.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain advanced knowledge and skills in artistic possibilities of projection.
Examination:



Quick & Dirty
Cocky Eek
Mandatory for: B1

In this course you will be dipped in a method of the making process. The making process by its own nature, offers many surprising, irrational, accidental possibilities that the mind simply cannot predict or imagine.
The class will explore this creative process as a dialogue between maker and matter in diverse mediated forms, in which matter can be interpreted broadly, but which is always the available reality that is transformed in the making process. We’ll do quick hands-on experiments and dirty prototyping, with the aim to train our skills of perception, to learn to recognize when/where things get interesting, and to tap in the enormous potential that comes by working open-ended.
You will work on an individual base as well in a group process and documentation/recording can be helpful tool in the making process.
No Matter – Try Again – Fail Again – Fail Better, Samuel Beckett

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to master quick artistic sketching methodologies.
Examination: attendance, assignment



RecPlay (Sem1)
RecPlay (Sem2)
Kasper van der Horst, Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: free choice

Since 2001, RecPlay is the ArtScience improvisation ensemble. Some of the research topics that are adressed in the RecPlay are multi-player interfaces, improvisation structures, noise art, feedback in image and sound, realtime composition systems, spatial compositions and interaction with architectural elements. Its practical focus will be on developing improvisations and compositions and on developing ensemble playing using unconventionall instruments.
For a number of years, students have participated in this live electronica and mechanica improvisation group initiated by Robert Pravda. It has had regular performances in various well- known as well as obscure venues, for instance in places like Vooruit, Gent, Zeebelt, Den Haag, Worm, Rotterdam, TodaysArt festival and EXIS, Den Haag, RADIO West, STRP festival Eindhoven, Korzo, Den Haag, Transmediale, Berlin and many more.

Credits: 4 ECTS (first semester) + 4 ECTS (second semester). The first and second semester can be followed seperately or both.
No. of classes: approx 10 classes of 2.5 hours (first semester) + approx 10 classes of 2.5 hours (second semester) plus presentations
Objective: To learn how to work in an audiovisual improvisation ensemble.
Examination: attendance, performances



Redeconstruct Media
Kasper van der Horst, Nenad Popov
Mandatory for: free choice

In a number of steps, we aim to look a bit into the phenomena of fragmented media.We will look into ways of deconstructing ideas into smaller fragments, or constructing larger structures out of smaller pieces all the while trying to keep the original knowledge(idea) present as long as possible.“Ecological thinking” – we look at the artwork as an ecosystem of ideas: we try to think and find out in which way the fragments interact with each other. During the course, we like to look at media in the broadest (metamedia) sense – for example text, literature, data, music scores, dna, wikipedia articles, pixels, artworks, social interaction, audio and video can all be your point of interest.                                                                                                The course consists of a series of simple exercises, starting with the art of abbreviation, gently crossing the media boundaries and then getting into more or less speculative reconstruction methods of media.( veracious or manupilative : redeconstruct ) We also look into how the meaning mutates when the artwork passes through multiple minds.  Our objective is to design individual systems, and because we can also design these systems in an artistic way, that is where we will focus on. Some participants will stay in the analogue domain, while others might find algorithmic solutions to work with. After the first steps of exploring we take our time to develop a very personal point of view for each individual student’s perspective.    At the end of this two week’s course we ‘ll ask you to present your system in the format of a work or to present a conclusion of how your system works.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to handle the defragmentation of contemporary media in an artistic manner.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Sensors, Actuators & Microcontrollers
Lex van den Broek, Johan van Kreij
Mandatory for: free choice

This course is a continuation of the Introduction to Electronics that is given in the first year. It is open to other students who have at least some familiarity with the most basic concepts of electronics. In this course students learn how to understand and build simple setups consisting of a sensor, a controller and an actuator. The concepts behind controllers like the ipsonlab and the Arduino or Wiring board are introduced. The most common types of sensors are introduced and how to connect them and interpret the data they produce. Also the most common actuators will be introduced.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain more advanced insight in the creation of electronic circuits for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Simplicity and Complexity
Marion Tränkle
Mandatory for: free choice

The goal of this workshop is to create a shared playing-field of research, and to experiment with rule-based collective performance/movement systems. We will look at how actions can be generated by setting simple rules and conditions, and how the coupling of those rules can give rise to complex behaviour.
Roughly speaking, one says that complexity depend on the concept of a system or structure, a set of components that relate to each other. Thereby, the behaviour of a complex system is particular, but at the same time not an obvious consequence of the known interaction among the parts. Examples of complex systems or phenomena are: The economy, the weather, ant colonies, earthquakes, traffic jams, living organisms, ecosystems, turbulence, river networks, zebra stripes, and sea-shell patterns.
During the four-day workshop, we will divide our time between learning, observing actions, and experimenting with collective compositions and performance systems – going through fast cycles of making and re-making.
There are no prerequisites to take the workshop, but the willingness of each individual to take part in a collective endeavour and to move in space is vital.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop insight and skills in the artistic possibilities of the relation between simplicity and complexity.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Sound == Image
Bas van Koolwijk
Mandatory for: free choice

About direct translations between sound and image, from its mechanical origins to its present day electronic and digital forms.
The objective is to build your own application.
PLEASE NOTE: There is a maximum of 10 students for this course.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn about relationships between sound and image and to explore them in your own work.
Examination: attendance, assignment



SoundWorlds
Robert Pravda, Milica Ilić
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of working with sound, to teach the handling of basic recording and studio equipment and to offer basic insight in general music theory. Also a short introduction will be given to the history of electro-acoustic music and basic concepts of composition.
The theoretical part will cover:
– Basic parameters of sound, such as the concepts of sound as change of pressure through the air, waveform and harmonic spectrum of the sound, wavelength, amplitude, frequency and perception of pitch and loudness. Also we will discuss the basics of analog sound, digital sound, synthesis basics (additive, subtractive synthesis, Frequency modulation) and MIDI.
– An introduction to the basics of musical dramaturgy, or “how to organise sound” – historical overview, explaining & exploring different musical tools and their practical use, demystification of the so called “classical music” world, with the goal of expanding the palette of means that can be used in artistic work which includes sound/music.
On the practical side an introduction will be given to basic studio hardware and software, such as the mixing desk, amplifiers, speakers, cables and types of microphones and their uses use: XY, AB, MS, Binaural. We will talk about recording, sampling, editing, sound effects and various software and plugins.
During the course we will listen to pieces from important composers and discuss them. We will discuss examples of noise music, musique concrète, soundscapes, electronic music, sound- plays and field-recordings, but also other types of music in order to see how musical systems work.
All the students attending the course are expected to finish a number of exercises in listening, recording and editing. At the end of the course each student is asked to produce a composition in sound.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain fundamental insight in the workings of music and sound.
Examination: attendance, assignment



SoundWorlds 2: Sounding Space, Spacing Sound
Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: free choice

As much as we experience our environment visually, we also have an ability to sense our environment through listening. We sense the spatial attributes through hearing as something parallel to our visual perception. What we hear is a complex mixture of the surrounding sound with its reflections, dispersion, refraction and absorption, all determined by the specific (unique) acoustic character of the space. While listening, we react both to sound sources and to spatial acoustics.
In the first week of the course, we will build upon the SoundWorlds introduction course, with emphasis on more advanced approach to different techniques in sound recording, synthesis, transformation and spatialisation.
The second week will be dedicated to development and hands-on experiments in; how to approach sound organisation for a multichannel sound reproduction, a live performance setup, or a sound installation based on individual artistic ideas of the participants.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain more advance knowledge in the workings of sound in its environment.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Spectra – Space as an Organism III
Julia Willms, Andrea Božić
Mandatory for: free choice (CASS Exchange Workshop)

In this in-disciplinary workshop we will approach space as performative and as an organism. We will explore a combination of live performance, cinematic/virtual and architectural space merging them into one layered hybrid space in their overlap, a merger between the physical, imaginal and virtual.
The students will work in small collaborative groups exploring performative and audio-visual installative spatial set ups and narratives. We will look at the development of dramaturgy, how a work works depending on its placement in space and time. We will work through a combination of making, presenting and feedback discussion. We will give some examples of our own work.
The students are asked to bring their own audio-visual digital devices that they normally use in their artistic practice. Further they are asked to bring a piece of material of their interest (text fragment, dream, visual narrative, piece of sound etc) which has an inherent dramaturgy, which can be analysed and used as departure point.
The first day of the workshop is used to give an introduction to our way of working and some background information. Full participation in the workshop is requested, as each day will build on the previous.
The workshop is part of Spectra – Space as an Organism, our long term artistic practice and research into attention and space and how their organisation affects our sense of embodiment, emergent realities and infrastructures. In Spectra we work with the whole space and the visitor’s presence in it as part of the work. There is no such thing as empty space or a position outside of space. We are not in the space but we are space.
Keywords: in-disciplinary, porous space, performance, live art, performative space, choreography of space, gaze and attention, space as an organism, audio-visual installation, architectural intervention, installation as a performance.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain artistic insight in how space, attention and their organisation affect our sense of embodiment, emergent realities and infrastructures.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Studium Generale
Hanne Hagenaars (KABK) et al
Mandatory for: B2

The Studium Generale offers a nearly weekly programme of lectures of very different nature, based around a yearly central theme. Mandatory for second year Bachelors, but highly recommended for all other years of the Bachelors and Masters!

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: approx 24 classes of 1.5 hours
Objective: To gain general contextual insight.
Examination: attendance



Tension Machines II: Sound
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: free choice

note; For this 2nd edition of Tension Machines we focus exclusively on sound and sound properties, resulting in an array of SONIC Tension Machines.
Common usage suggests we speak of the machine as a subset of technology.
We could – however – consider the technological as dependent on machines and not the inverse. This is especially interesting if we look at how various technologies are applied in theater:
Technology has a significant presence in the theater space and it’s role is crucial in the historical development of theater, performance and dance. Ranging from a single light-bulb to more complicated electro-mechanical installations, the presence of any electronic or mechanic devices assists or, to a greater or lesser extend, influences the play.
However, apart from a few exceptions, the aim of these technologies remains to establish a space for concentration on the actions of human performers and musicians.
Considering the reversed notion of technology as dependent on machines, the machine is not simply a technical device with particular functions, but a bundle of forces.
This notion allows us to introduce the PERFORMER as OPERATOR: The performer becoming part of the machinery. Not only by creating controls or interfaces for it but also criss-crossing the mechanic and electronic with the living human form.
Staging the structural relation between bodies and materials in a machinic assemblage not only creates particular forms, it articulates forces. The assemblage then has the potential to develop into a highly condensed scene. A physical or conceptual Tension Machine.
Production
Depending on the participants choice of concept or objective an array of machines (materials and energies) is created in order to articulate various forces.
i.e. expand / fill / grow / lengthen / open / pull / inflate / run / span / spread / strain
In an effort to achieve a scene that is not just a scene but a demonstration of forces, each type of machine will be examined – not for it’s autonomy or function – but for what force it wants to articulate. The experiments consist of spatial, temporal and corporeal acts applied to shorter movement phrases or longer, durational sequences.
The human presence is subject to the assemblage, creating a set of operations that are co-produced ‘through’ the outcome of the chosen force(s)

Please note: This course exists of two seperate parts. It is not possible to follow only one part of the course.

Credits: 6 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours in semester 1 plus a working week with performance on location in semester 2
Objective: To work on a performative project on location in ZAAL3 in The Hague.
Examination: attendance, assignment



The Four Ecologies
Eric Kluitenberg
Mandatory for: free choice (Master Primer)

Forget about the anthropocene!
(for now)
Let’s talk about the escalating ecological crisis.
What is needed first is a broader synthetic perspective,
before deciding on what exactly is to be done.

Perhaps the most important book written by philosopher activist and psychoanalyst Felix Guattari could be The Three Ecologies. Originally published in 1989 it has lost nothing of its urgency and remains one of the most startling analyses of the unfolding (and escalating) ecological crisis ‘we’ — all living and sentient species on earth — are facing.
In the book Guattari argues that the ecological crisis is generally understood far too narrowly as ‘environmental pollution’, a managerial or engineering problem that should and can be solved with appropriate technocratic procedures. Guattari pleads for a much deeper and more layered understanding of this crisis, which should be addressed through three ecological registers at once, the material environment, the social relations, and subjective experience: the three ecologies.
Any approach to this most profound crisis ever faced by humans (and non-humans) should operate transversally, in across and between these three registers. The reduction to the material / environmental is a fatal misconception according to Guattari. For instance, can we really see and treat environmental degradation and global warming separate from the migration crises and geopolitical fall-out zones? Can we really see and treat the structures of contemporary economies and politics as unrelated to the explosive growth of mental disorders? Can we really be open and responsive to the earth-system (Gaia), without giving due recognition to the importance of a sustainable ‘mental ecology’?
Still, despite its radically enlarged understanding of what the term ‘ecology’ actually implies, and notwithstanding the inclusion of subjective experience as a crucial ecological register (which makes Guattari’s analysis so extremely productive for the arts), there is a severe limitation in Guattari’s perspective that needs to be urgently addressed. His analysis remains ultimately predicated on an anthropocentric perspective. Perhaps because his long and deep involvement with Deleuze’s neo-materialist philosophy of emergence blinded him to his own implicit biases.

Beyond anthropocentrism
Ecological thinking has since moved to critique exactly this human-centric perspective and made a strong plea for the inclusion of the ‘non-humans’ (animal and plant life, but also air, soil, minerals, materials, technological objects and systems) in any progressive ecological politics. Sociologist and philosopher of science Bruno Latour has undoubtedly been the most prominent proponent of this enlarged conception of ecology. His plea to bring the non-humans into the heart of democracy has received ever growing attention and support.
To address this limitation in Guattari’s otherwise brilliant analysis it is necessary to introduce a fourth ecological register: that of the non-human experience. Hence, the four ecologies.
This course will develop the conceptual model of the four ecologies to then ask what type of ‘deliberate interventions’ are required and conceivable to address the escalating ecological crisis? (beyond the buzzword of the anthropocene)
These ‘deliberate interventions’ can include interventions from the arts, from activism, policy interventions, research interventions, and political interventions. Together I call such an approach ecological design, where ‘design’ refers to ‘any deliberate form of intervention’.

Structure of the course
The course develops this broad synthetic perspective by first addressing the four ecological registers separately:
Ecology 1: The material environment. Ecology 2: The social relations. Ecology 3: Subjective experience. Ecology 4: The non-human experience.
In practice these four registers continuously fold into each other, so connections between the registers will also be developed throughout the discussion. Also, with respect to each of these ‘registers’ and across all of them we can ask what the role of the arts can be in addressing the ecological crisis? Most important of all, asking such big questions — of at least planetary dimensions — it is crucial to be attentive to detail and ethics: Proposing at first the smallest possible steps, before ‘scaling up’.
The second part of the course is devoted to these deliberate interventions: the smallest steps and their ability to scale up, and the question how to give voice to those who do not speak in a human voice: the non-humans.
Course participants will be asked to develop their own deliberate / designed interventions and present them as material / conceptual prototypes in the final session, where they will be put up for collective scrutiny and deliberation.

Principal literature
Felix Guattari (1989): The Three Ecologies, Athlone Press, London, 2000 / Editions Galilée, Paris, 1989.
Bruno Latour (2004): Politics of nature – how to bring the sciences into democracy, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (Mass.).
Bruno Latour (2017): Facing Gaia : eight lectures on the new climatic regime, Polity Press, Cambridge / Medford.
Timothy Morton (2007): Ecology without Nature – Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (Mass.).
Brian Holmes (2015): The River and the Steersman – Capital Circulation in the Anthropocene (lecture transcript) – http://threecrises.org/the-river-and-the-steersman/

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To investigate theoretical perspectives on contemporary society alongside four ‘ecologies’.
Examination: attendance, assignment



The City as Performative Object
Esther Polak
Mandatory for: free choice

The workshop focuses on performance art in public space. The course starts with student re-enactments of groundbreaking performances and will develop into a more student-directed approach where performances are produced either in groups or individually.

For art students, it is often challenging to contextualize their practice within existing art history. During this workshop, students are invited to research one aspect of the art history, performance art in public space, in a playful and participatory way. The research will be executed not from behind the desktop but by foot: literally by re-enacting historical performances in Den Haag. Students pick a performance piece and re-enact it in their city environment. Before going into the street students will formulate a question that they “ask the performance” and that will be answered after the re-enactment. The work method is inspired by experimental archaeology: a scientific approach where prehistoric situations are studied by re-enacting lifestyles, tool building, working practices. Applying this method to the recent history of performance art in public space will open up for a dynamic form of embodied knowledge concerning an ephemeral art form.
Example: A group of students wants to question Sophie Calle’s Suite Vénitienne (1980) and Vito Acconci’s Following Piece (1969). Their research question could be: “How do both works differ in their relation to surveillance issues.” They will do their research by re-enacting both pieces and answer from their experience. The outcome could be that “Calle focusses on one person, while Acconci work method is repetitive, choosing his subjects anonymously.” From experience, they might find that “the fact that Calle is female and Acconci male, makes the work function differently.” But of course, this could also be an entirely different answer. The answers can take unexpected forms; they could be new performances, images or poems. The question, re-enactment and conclusion are being shared for example on a blog. Students are encouraged to collaborate in documenting the work.
The course will start focussing on relatively famous works so that the feel of stepping onto “sacred art historical ground” is part of the experience. We will offer a set of performances to pick from (see the attached list with suggestions), but students are also free to choose their own. The only restriction is that the performance is executed in public space. During the workshop, the students will decide for themselves if they want to develop new performance pieces or to incorporate their experiences in any other way into their artistic process. The workshop is open for working alone or in groups.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to deal with the city as a medium for artistic works.
Examination: attendance, assignment



The Materiality of Sound
Channa Boon
Mandatory for: free choice

The course works with sound, space, performance, the human body and takes on the Philosophical ideas around the Chtulucene (Donna Haraway) and that of the so called ‘New Materialism’ in a practical way. Stemming from this is the notion that sound is a ‘material’, physical phenomenon, as well as the fact that a sculpture from this perspective can be seen as a living object. The ‘abstract’ as well as the strict division between the so called ‘dead’ and ‘living’ material does not exist or, in case of the latter, is fluid. Through concrete exercises and investigations making use of the space of the building, its urban environment as well as the human body as ‘instruments’, these ideas will be taken on dby the students on an in2depth, broad, and as rich way as possible. Short lectures,
presentations and individual tutorials create a stage for the workflow that results in a final
presentation held for an audience of Art Science students; a clear momentum in which the
different ideas are being ‘tested’.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To become acquainted with and training the physical approach and quality of
sound and space, the acoustic body, the different relating philosophical concepts of these
phenomena and collaboration.
Examination: attendance, assignment



The ‘Other’ Senses
Caro Verbeek
Mandatory for: B1

The senses of  smell, taste, touch and proprioception are powerful tools for engaging an audience in an intimate and often interactive way. They require little knowledge and they are strong inducers of vivid memories.
Whereas sound and vision always gained a lot of academic attention, the so called ‘lower’ senses only recently (re-)entered the artistic debate. The ArtScience Interfaculty, formerly known as the Institute for Image and Sound, underlines the importance of those other senses that go beyond our traditional occularcentric approach.
This course is about creating awareness and understanding of the role of the ‘other’ senses – smell, touch and taste – in (history of) art, education and science.
For they are not as divided as we assume, the correlation between the senses will also be addressed (synaesthesia).
Due to their animalistic nature important thinkers like Plato, and later on Kant and Hegel excluded the lower senses from the aesthetic debate. As a counter-reaction famous artists like Marinetti and Duchamp and composers such as Scriabin incorporated olfactory and tactile dimensions to their work. Unfortunately this quite volatile heritage was partially lost due to its fleeting nature and the impossibility of registering and preserving smells, tastes and tactile experiences. Museums and other institutes that address vision, have always been primed to collect and conserve. That is why many tactile and olfactory works of art never made it into written history. Anthropologists, art historians and other academics are now working on a reconstruction.
During classes students will encounter sensory art historical reconstructions to stimulate debate on the senses and as an inspiration to create small olfactory and tactile compositions. A colour-smell synaesthesia test will be executed on the first and the last day of the course.
Furthermore there will be a linguistic translation of a Futurist tactile poem, and an olfactory-musical recital composed by Scriabin.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop knowledge about artistic practices for other human senses than the usual sight and hearing.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Time as Matter
Willem van Weelden
Mandatory for: free choice

Time as Matter is a seminar and workshop course in 8 installments, dedicated to the unravelling and inspirational use of the landmark manifestation ‘Les Immateriaux’, held 28.03.1985 – 15.07.1985 in the Centre Pompidou (C.C.I., Centre de Création Industrielle), Paris. This prestigeous and expensive manifestation was the first time a philosopher (Jean-François Lyotard, 1924-1998) was invited to operate as a curator and work together with a team of professionals (headed by Thierry Chaput). (Inaaa the limited period it was open to the public, it was visited by over 200.000 people.) The preparations took a few years in which Lyotard was invoved in the last 1½ year, determining its overall conceptual address: ‘Les Immateriaux’, the immaterials. This neologism, invented by Lyotard, pointed to the felt necessity to redefine and reconceptualize matter, as the emergence of new materiality had risen by the advancement in telecommunication technology. The prefix ‘im-’ announced a break from the modern conception of material, language, body, science, and art.
As a manifestation (it specifically avoided the term ‘exhibition’) it experimented with a multi-medial dramaturgy in its set up and delivery of its philsophical quests. For Lyotard, in the eighties, had dedicated himself to probe the possibilities to ‘do philsophy by other means’. His effort was to create with this dedicated team an interactive, self-authoring philosophical experience for its visitors, rather than a passive instructional exposure to philosophical discourse.
The seminar will consist of lectures on the conceptualisation of this manifestation, and its relevance today, its philosophical background and context, and a speculation on how to use its medial criticality to current usages of (interactive) media in both artistic and discursive manners. ‘Les Immateriaux’ as a dramaturgical set-up, and interactive parcours consisted of 67 sites and was designed with the inclusion of a grid of 26 dedicated audio-zones. Each visitor was equiped with an infra-red headphone to mark his specific pathway with these dedicated sounds. In this sense audio (as ‘the art of time’) became the important and critical agent to its address and ambitions. In the lectures special attention will be given to the dramaturgical aspects of its use of audio.
The workshop will consist of a series of 8 sessions in which the students are challenged to develop their own project based on actively following the seminar.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To understand ‘immaterials’ and to develop individual projects around them.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Transient Spaces
Benny Nilsen
Mandatory for: free choice

Through the means of field recording, we will explore and unfold so-called non-places or in-between spaces in our city and its boundaries.
Spaces that we pass through quickly or that we simply perceive as being convenient, such as short cuts, intersections, shopping malls, undeveloped areas or bridges.
Together we will expand on them, analyze them and give them a voice through recordings and compositions which will result in a short final presentation.
I will give advice on recording techniques, sound manipulation and composition. We will have listening sessions, excursions and practical exercises.
Definition of transient
1a : passing especially quickly into and out of existence : transitory transient beauty
1b : passing through or by a place with only a brief stay or sojourn transient visitors
2 : affecting something or producing results beyond itself
Reader:
Marc Augé – Non-Places, introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To understand and work with non-spaces in a sound environment..
Examination: attendance, assignment



We Are Compost. Multispecies Storytelling in the Age of the Anthropocene
Márton Kabai
Mandatory for: free choice

Crises, loss, alienation, and precarity becomes a defining trait of our everyday’s life. At the same time networks of new technologies promises steadiness, believes and a bright future, however, it makes us detached, anesthetized, sedated to confront with ourselves, our history and our contribution to the troubles. In this accumulating, systemic illiteracy foreshadows a very dark new age, where we need to rethink what is the human species if we acknowledge that design is what makes us human. How to design ourselves out of this gap or wound? What way we can collectively imagine, construct different forms of relationships?
Along the four days, we will undergo a trans-generational, intra-active, trans-species, symbiogenetic, speculative workshop inspired by Donna Haraway’s Camille stories. Each day, we will live and design props out of relationships of one generation (approx. 25 years) of the community of Compost. At the end of the four days, we will leave behind a speculative archeological site: physical or virtual props, poems, rituals, drawings, algorithms..etc that tells fragments of stories of four generations of an intra-species community of Compost. (approx: 100 years). Along the ‘workshop’, we will investigate and experiment different ways and forms of narrative and storytelling methods that respond to and challenging the condition of our critical times by rethinking and questioning the way we are and we will co-exist on Earth.
We are Compost is an ongoing research with Natela Lemondzhava as KLMN Salon
Part of the ArtFiction series

Recommended literature:
Donna Haraway: Staying with the trouble, Making Kin in the Chthulucene (Duke)
James Bridle: New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future (Verso)
Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley: Are we human? Notes on the archeology of design (Lars Muller)

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain designing skills in the context of contemporary ecological situation.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Writing as/in Research
Maya Rasker
Mandatory for: free choice

To write, means to allow ideas, notions, knowledge, nonsense to come into being – which is a good reason why so many fear the act of writing: once written, your thoughts become a reality of their own. During the workshop Writing as / in Research we will investigate what writing means – as an act of unravelling and discovering of the mind’s working, rather than to fixate embryonal cerebral thinking (that often should not see the light of day – yet).
Point of departure is you – a creative creature that oscillates between who you are, what you do, and where you are heading. Through a sytematic analysis of the creative process you will discover how different writing techniques support and enhance your personal search for artistic growth – no matter your medium or main artistic interest.
Language is our material, so the course encompasses lots of writing, reading, listening and taking notes. The use of pen, or pencil, and paper is obligatory. No laptops allowed in the classroom.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop writing skills as an artistic discipline, and/or as a tool to develop artistic research.
Examination: attendance, assignment