Courses

Ars Electronica
Cocky Eek, Arthur Elsenaar, Kasper van der Horst, Taconis Stolk & teachers from I/M/D (KABK) and MediaTechnology (Leiden University)
Mandatory for: B1, M1

Excursion to the Ars Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria: one of the most prominent festivals of new media art in the world.

Credits: 1 EC
No. of classes: Excursion of approx 4 days
Examination: Attendance


Art, Philosophy & MetaMedia
Taconis Stolk, Rob van Gerwen
Mandatory for: B1

This course will be a mix between two approaches to inspire and influence each other. The two approaches will alternate per day and come together in the end.
A. Art and philosophy.
Philosophical questions typical for interdisciplinary arts are just like those asked about the arts, traditionally so-conceived. Only with an interdisciplinary art, these questions tend to be more complicated and intertwined. Working from examples, we delve into the philosophy of art in an effort to understand what artscience is, or what it might be.
We look at questions such as: What is artistic material, what should happen for material to become artistic? How does something become a work of art? How do we find out what a work means—how can we discuss about such meanings: isn’t it all very subjective? How may we experience a work in the most fruitful manner—can someone teach you to discern something in a work which you failed to notice on your own? How can art forms be distinguished from each other, and why is it important to think about this? What are the differences between art and real-life, between art and science? Students are challenged to make a work with these questions in mind.
B. MetaMedia.
A work of art does not confine itself to an object, a picture or a sound composition. Especially not in the 21st century, where all kinds of communication technologies and strategies can be used to compose the context of art, or even to create works in disciplines and using methods that were never explored by artists before. In this course, students are given a theoretical and practical framework on how to compose concepts and context. Approaching contemporary art as a conceptual communication model opens possibilities for unusual works of art and a critical attitude towards traditional artistic paradigms, but it also creates a framework for students to develop new and effective strategies for a professional creative position in a media world. Students will create their own metamedial works during the course.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Catching the Light
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: B1

A work of art does not often come to its maker mysteriously like a visionary dream or out of nowhere and already worked out. And even when this happens it remains a question how to continue from there? In normal circumstances, the best ideas come while fiddling around, but how do you fiddle constructively?
An important aspect of the craft of artists working in any medium is sketching; how to generate ideas and how to draw consequences from them. Sketching can be a method of recording or prototyping an idea but it is also a powerful tool for discovery. The process of sketching enables you to deepen a thought, explore a fascination or playfully engage with elements that open up new directions in a work. It is a method to find things that you would never have found otherwise.
In this (edition of sketching methods) workshop we will be working with light exclusively. With an array of light techniques, integrated in various configurations, we will observe and explore different qualities of light such as glint’s, emanations, flicker and other phenomena that occur in and out of our setups. Light itself is immaterial so we need tools to ‘catch’ it. Instruments and materials that enable us to control and compose with the projected light. Following a number of simple steps, the tools will give insight about the light phenomena that are explored, and provide ideas for further development and experiment. These steps involve observation and investigation as much as mental-projection and decision-making. Therefore, documentation and recording of the process is an important aspect of the workshop. Recording your process does not only help you in making decisions, it also enables you to learn more about your personal preferences and working methods.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Ch-ch-changes
Zoro Feigl
Mandatory for: B1

As a project we all invent/design/make something that has a limited lifetime. A machine that becomes old, grows, develops. A form of something time constrained. Something that is not the same at the beginning and the end of the presentation. A work that comes alive or dies, grows up or grows old, emerges or disappears.
Try to use the properties of your materials and how they change over time or what shapes them. what makes this material change, what is the proces behind it?  Think about how to shorten or lengthen this process in a way that it’s transformation links to the duration of a couple hours.
This can be a very transparent process or a singularity waiting to happen.
It could be a process waiting to reveal itself or a work struggling for its existence. All is possible as long as the beginning is not (the same as) the end.
For our monday meeting I want you to bring us all some examples of things/materials/objects/processes that can change within the duration of a day. This could be either governed by the laws of nature or controlled by you. Something that is reversible or irreversible. Something destructive or constructive, as long as it is something that is not the same at the beginning of our meeting as it is on the end. A proces that you can set up and leave alone and wil come back to a different thing. Please bring us at least one such example from of your own observation outside the arts.
Please bring us the actual things instead of documentation, we all would like to see each others changing things..

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: assignments, attendance


Context Composition
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B3

In nowadays media world, context is (nearly) everything. This course will reflect on the position of the artist in the field. A discussion that is especially important for students ArtScience, since there work can often be presented in very different contexts. Students will be encouraged to develop an artistic view on their public image and all other context in the media, and their body of work as a whole: to compose them in relation to the individual artworks that make up their practice. To use contextual elements as artistic space.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Everyday Machines Prototyping Feedback
Mariska de Groot
Mandatory for: free choice (AS/Son/Com Exchange Workshop)

The first attempts of inventions are often made out of household materials in the absence of better ones, creatively used in order to make ideas work out quickly. These used materials are on itself a front-to-end designed, ‘perfect’ and ready product, designed for the everyday ritual of grinding, toasting, boiling, cleaning. When modeling new instruments – or new rituals – these devices are brought back into the circle of prototyping.
During this week we’ll act on this conceptual feedback on prototyping with a mainly hands-on approach. We’ll inform ourselves about the obvious and hidden qualities of (electronic) devices, alienate their parts and function from their designed purpose and give them a new interpretation for a new ritual. 
During the process we’ll keep in mind that with the creation of the instrument comes the creation of an experience. How to perform this new prototype in a meaningful way? At the end of the week the new prototypes and their ritual will be presented.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Extremophiles
Cocky Eek & guests
Mandatory for: free choice (AS/Son/Com Exchange Workshop)

This week we’ll work outside on the Zandmotor (Kijkduin), which is an unforgiving environment, a protoworld on the edge of the The Hague that has only recently formed by man, based on the concept of “building with nature” as a defense against coastal erosion, This experimental solution uses the natural movement of the tides, wind, waves and currents to replenish the beaches of south holland. Almost as an ephemeral land art intervention, the Zandmotor is expected to disappear soon. How can you adapt to this extreme tidal space, a wide open stretch of sand, without shelter or socket outlet.
This week is an opportunity to experience to work with natural elements, while being part of the process and to sense that everything is in continual movement. We’ll explore this newest bit of the Netherlands as a blank canvas, where you will zoom in a specific phenomena or quality you found there. Can these wild elements be composed into a work?

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


In Situ: Fortress 1818. Operation Maasmond
Michiel Pijpe, Onno Dirker, Christian van der Kooy
Mandatory for: free choice

— 1st Briefing
Fortress Hoek van Holland, in the past also known as ‘Fort Maasmond’ is a military coastal defense fortress, its design is based on the so called ‘Pantserfort’ architecture. It is build between 1880 and 1889, directly following the completion of “De Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Waterweg” in 1872. Its purpose, the protection of the Maas estuary. After the completion of “De Waterweg” in 1872, the Rotterdam harbor area was suddenly confronted with a shortened and open connection to the North Sea. This new route increased strategic values of the harbor for the hinterland, making it an interesting target for enemy fleets.
By dint of new development in weapons and arms industry around the 1880’s the Dutch government decided to build several armored fortresses close to – or in – open estuaries and waterways, protecting exposed harbors and vulnerable passageways into the country. Fortress 1881 in Hoek van Holland is one of these fortresses. It is one of the best kept military complexes of that era.

Innovation comes with adversity.
The development and technological progress in the arms industry created the possibility for advanced defense and destruction systems. During the construction of the fortress – around 1885 – state of the art weapon systems were installed. The guns were able to reach 8 km, and could penetrate armored vessels if they were within a 6, 5 km scope. The guns in this fortress however soon lost their assets the following decade because of developments triggered by the industrial revolution and 1st WW. English battleships, for instance, were able to reach much further already before 1914 and the fortress was unable to defend itself against airstrikes from a new generation of fighters able to carry heavy bombs. As a consequence, the Fortress’s original military purpose was already obscured only a few years after it was built.
The same could be said about the development of the surrounding area for which the fortress was built. Engineers, who were involved in the research and development stage of the “waterweg” project, envisioned a hybrid design that would use natural processes. They assumed they could control the dredging using the forces of natural water flows and siltation. Similar to how, for instance, the ‘Zandmotor’ is shaped. Unfortunately, the influence of the tides worked too well, rendering this forward-looking approach useless and forcing the government to intervene. Issuing a command that forced the engineers to ‘save’ the project using conventional techniques of dredging as opposed to the more hybrid approach the engineers dreamed of, leaving behind an irreversible mark on the landscape.
Fortress 1881 and its surrounding landscape illustrate these adversities with a plethora of fascinating mistakes, failures and miscalculations. It reveals all the differences in perception and approach, clear evidences of which can be found everywhere. It’s a storied history of incompetence in politics, economy, geology and architecture.

— The objective: Operation MaasMond
What is the significance of such misfortune and what are the implications of these unfortunate developments in our time? How does this history translate into contemporary situations?
The adversities are an essential and potentially productive aspect of our consciousness, a distinctive facet of our current human condition. Closely related to concepts like fear and dread, the anxiety that comes with technological advancements are associated with “The dizziness of freedom” as formulated by Søren Kierkegaard in 1844. The connotations may be dark and fateful; the adversities also enable us to envision spectacular alternatives to our world. The creative potential of the dialectics of lead are of great value to us in these complex times.
As mentioned above, the fortress and its surrounding area are perfect examples of wondrous conjunctions between architecture, technology and geological engineering. It reveals to us the underlying futility of attempts made by humans to use technology and skill to get a grip on our surroundings. We are, and always will be, run out by our own future.
As a (con)temporary commanding crew of this bastion – on this historically significant location – we set off to create new ideas, impressions and images for a story that has been told many times. Fortress 1881 is our vehicle for doing so, carrying us back in time, launching us towards a projected future in which the adversities become hypothetical scenarios for poetic translations.
Perhaps, like us, you will be captured by the bizarre details of this undisclosed legacy, embedded in a
emblematic landscape, so typical for the Netherlands.
Practical
The operation follows three basic strategies: observations, briefings and execution.
Participants will receive a concise reader beforehand for basic preparation.
Several talks, field trips and screenings are organized, providing participants with in- depth information on the history and future of this site and its surrounding landscape. F1881 provides the crew with simple accommodations, basically turning the project into a short residency program where participants can experience what it’s like living in the fortress. The entire duration of the project covers two months, including an exhibition where the results of our research will be presented. The exhibition runs from the 2nd – 23rd of December.
Specialized officers (guest-lectures) and field trip details
To be announced (confirmed are cartographer / urban planner, an excursion to dredging simulation machines in Rotterdam and a field trip to the 2nd Maasvlakte)

Note
((In case of emergency, the entire complex was shut down from its surroundings and access to the fortress was impossible. During a raid or crises, the isolated fortress could function as independent war-unit. Stored in the fortress, a stockpile provided the soldiers and other crew with a ration to sit-out a 30 day siege. Originally, the garrison of this fortress consisted of 284 people, 9 of which were officers, 26 NCO’s and 3 laundry woman. The 246 remaining were soldiers))

Credits: 8 EC
No. of classes: 16 classes of 6 hrs plus working on location in Hoek van Holland. The opening of the exhibition is on Dec 2nd.
Examination: Assignments, attendance
Maximum no. of students: 18 (If the amount of subscriptions exceeds the maximum capacity of the fortress, the installment of the crew will be based on a balloting system.)


Intro Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: B1

The intention of this course is to experiment in a playful way with projection in relation to your work. Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. Also shadow and coloured light can be interpreted as projection.
As an assignment, you will be asked to make a projection design that connects with your own work and/or ideas.
keywords: •projecting on objects •surfaces •live playing •how to use audio signals •no-source •feedback video •minimal projection •ganzfeld projection •we’ll also briefly look into how tv’s, videorecorders and analog video mixers work.
For students who followed an earlier projection course, there will be some new topics to look into, such as video mapping, high quality projection and the use of the more advanced digital video mixers that combine analog and digital image sources.
Due to the available amount of equipment, there’s a limited number of students that can enrol.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Introduction to ArtScience
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B1, M1

This course is an introduction to important developments through the history of the arts that are important to the ArtScience domain. Five approaches to interrelate selected art works will be presented in class. The presented works range from realized and unrealized artworks to concepts. The five approaches are chosen in such a way as to trigger discussion and reflection both on existing works and your own work.

Credits: 1 EC
No. of classes: 2 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Attendance, participation


Introduction to Electronics

Lex van den Broek
Mandatory for: B1

This is a general introduction to working with electronics. It consists of three introductory classes. After those you are expected to finish your first electronic patch in individual appointments with Lex van den Broek.

Credits: 1 EC
No. of classes: 3 classes of 2.5 hrs plus individual appointments
Examination: Attendance, assignment


Introduction to Programming
Jeroen Meijer
Mandatory for: B1

This is an introductory course into computer programming. After following this course, students will have a basic insight into computer programming and will know where to start creating digital prototypes for future projects that involve interaction, image, sound, video, networks and electronics.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Small assignments, attendance


Introduction to the Cultural Studies in Technology
Dani Ploeger
Mandatory for: free choice

In this four-day course you will explore how the development and application of historical and contemporary technologies are embedded in society. Drawing from a collection of key texts from the 20th and 21st century, we will critique commonplace beliefs of technology as a ‘neutral force’, looking at its intertwinement with aspects of consumerism, militarism, gender, and ecology. In this, we will also consider relevant artwork.
The course involves a substantial amount of reading, most of which will be done in a group setting during class time, accompanied by frequent discussion interventions. For this reason, the course consists of four full days from 10:00-17:00, during which full attendance is required. In addition to the reading, you will be given several small practical tasks that explore possibilities to apply the theoretical frameworks of the course in artistic practice.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


IoT WtF 2.0
Arthur Elsenaar
Mandatory for: free choice

Better, faster, more bits for your hits.
— IoT
Indeed this year we not only reiterate the Internet of Things hacklab, but change it in a few ways. First of all we assume the IoT as a well known buzzword: i.e. add some electronics plus an internet connection to an object and observe wonderful new features that you can’t imagine ever to live without.. or the world will never be the same again.
Yeah yeah, we know. So what will this lab be about, what will we do or what will you learn? In one word “digital survival,” we hand you the tools: you will learn to master the command line, set up a cheap and powerful digital companion called a RaspberryPI, learn to dig up data from the deep web and float new data onto visible and perhaps physical surfaces.
— WtF
Terminal voodoo, Atom, Git & GitHub, RaspberryPI, GPIO, MQTT, OSC, NodeRED, Javascript, Python, JSON, Sensors, Actuators, SensorTag, Deep web.
— 2.0
A major change in this edition is that we expect a working project that critically reflects upon the IoT world of wonders and or creates an interface between the virtual and the physical.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: attendance, assignments


Kraków Disków
Kasper van der Horst, Robert Pravda, Taconis Stolk & guests from Krakow, Poland
Mandatory for: free choice

Two years ago, the Interfaculty went on a trip to Poland to collaborate with students from the Academy of Art and the Conservatory in Krakow. In this return visit, students will collaborate with students from Poland in developing projects in public space in The Hague.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: attendance, assignments


LIFE/FORMS, aesthetics and sensory translations of microscopic animated and inorganic matter
TeZ Maurizio Martinucci
Mandatory for: free choice

There’s a vibrant world of invisible and inaudible life that falls out of the envelope of our ordinary perception. It is inside and outside our bodies as well as in the food we eat, the water we drink and even in the air we breath. Our daily life is accompanied by a myriad of microscopic organisms who silently swarm, float and dance in their own quest for surviving, reproducing and evolving.
There also exist magnificent structures at invisible scales that form the geometrical architectures of crystals and lattices, the building blocks of what we call matter. These forms too undergo processes of evolution and transformations.
Using DIY (Do It Yourself) and DIWO (Do It With Others) strategies, this course aims at giving the students the ability to build affordable tools for microscopy and to learn ways to creatively treat the visual material in order to provide a multi-sensory and aesthetically appealing experience.
Microscopes at magnifications up to 200x can be obtained with modifications of cheap webcams and smartphone optics, so that micro-organisms like cyanobacteria, amoebas, tardigrades and innumerable other non organic structures are rendered to screen and made trackable through open source software. The visual output is remapped to other sensory modes such as hearing (sound/ speakers) and haptics (vibration/motors/transducers) so that the motion can be “felt” in unusual and surprising ways.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: approx. 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: attendance, assignments


Lighting Design for/as Performance
Katinka Marac
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to give an introduction to the theory and practice of lighting design and handling basic stage equipment. We will explore how meaning can be created using the exceptional possibilities of the medium light and how lighting design can be deployed in / as performance. During the course we’ll trace back the origins of lighting design in contemporary performance, by looking into the work and compositional methods of renowned American artists from the sixties and seventies and some of their contemporary predecessors as Xavier le Roi. In the seventies artists as Robert Rauschenberg and members of the New York based Judson group shared a keen interest in working at the intersection of (dance) performance, visual art and art & technology. They drastically changed (theatrical) performance, and the role of set and lighting design, freeing it from its former supportive role and incorporating them as equal elements in, or as starting points for performances. The course is set up as a creative lab. We’ll start with a short introduction in the various elements of a lighting design, including types of light, angles and colour and an introduction to technical aspects such as patch board, dimmers and the lighting board. We’ll research how lighting design can be used to create, structure and alter content, space and time and will work on lighting design as performance.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hrs plus presentation
Examination: Group lighting design assignments , performance review, attendance


Live Life, Life Live #3
Špela Petrič
Mandatory for: free choice

“Biomedia” is an instance in which biological components and processes are informatically recontextualized for purposes that may be either biological or non-biological. … Biomedia are particular mediations of the body, optimizations of the biological in which “technology” appears to disappear altogether.
Eugene Thacker, What is Biomedia?, 2003

The consequences of the collapse of an essential difference between living, informatic and material are encountered in every domain of society. Mostly they are celebrated as they pave the way to advances in agriculture, medicine, industry, urban planning, energy, leisure… However, this new paradigm, central to our changing conception of what it means to be human, requires testing and comprehension beyond the scope of scientific research and its subsequent applications in society. As this new space is aesthetically and conceptually unexplored territory, artists have been wandering the biotech cupboards, texts, protocols, hard-, soft- and wetware, often cooking up unexpected and controversial material very different in its goals and intentions from work done by scientists or engineers. But, contrary to the common perception of biotechnological control over life and its manipulation, it is foremost a practice struggling with the messy knot of human and non-human agencies amongst which the artist is just a moderator of the vivacious cacophony.
In this course you will work with living organisms and (semi-)living materials of plant and animal origin, in order to investigate the “making of life” and how we relate to it. This means growing organisms, hacking biological processes, and trying to make sense of everything that comes with it.
Theoretical lessons on biotech and bio art will be accompanied by hands-on experience in the Open Wetlab as well as field trips where you will get acquainted with working spaces needed to support the artistic research of living systems. The course will finish with a written proposal and its presentation during a public event at the Waag building.
After the course you are offered the possibility to continue and produce a project using the facilities of the Open Wetlab.

Keep in mind that this workshop will partly take place in the Open Wetlab at the Waag in Amsterdam and that these travel expenses are for your own costs. This course is organised in collaboration with the Open Wetlab of Waag Society.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs (some partly in the evening)
Examination: assignments, attendance


Media Subterraneus Reloaded. (An)archeologies of Media and Machines in Arts and Sciences
Eric Kluitenberg
Mandatory for: free choice

Media Archaeology has gained tremendous attention and popularity over the past two decades as a way of writing and researching the theories and histories of media/technology. The term and some of its key concepts have already been coined in 1996, more or less simultaneously by Siegfried Zielinski and Erkki Huhtamo. The recent upsurge in popularity even threatens to make the ‘field’ (if we can call it that) ‘fashionable’.
Some of its popularity may derive from the fact that the approaches proposed under the rubric of Media Archaeology have been particularly productive for understanding current developments in media technologies in a much broader historical and cultural frame. At the heart of this archaeology are the media machines, how they have been conceived, what was said and written about them, their physical manifestations, how they have been promoted or denounced, and the kind of imaginaries (dreams, phantasies and nightmares) they have given rise to.
Though sharp divisions already exist in this rather young discipline, between those who want to study only the machines versus those who advocate a more poetic approach – foregrounding the indispensable role of artistic subjectivity at the heart of the machine(s) – some agreement also exists: Media Archaeology does not write big History. It does not accept linearity. It refuses any kind of necessity of dependence or becoming. Media Archaeology is neither pessimistic nor optimistic – it digs, it explores, it traces, it compares. Media Archaeology is a search for patterns, it does not seek genius or a grand master narrative. Media Archaeology searches for the moments of greatest intensity (and diversity) in the development of the media, arts and technology. Media Archaeology remains a utopian project, in the words of Siegfried Zielinski, it attempts to “dig out secret pathways in history to help us find our way into the future” (1996).

Themes:
This course is structured around six interlocking themes:
• Archaeology of the Machine: Lewis Mumford – The Clock and the Mega-Machine.
• Siegfried Zielinski’s Deep Time of the Media: an/archaeologies of the media & the Variantology project: ‘Deep Time Relations in the Arts and Sciences’.
• Hardware Theory: Friederich Kittler’s Gramophone, Film, Typewriter
• AnArchaeology of the Machine Body
• Erkki Huhtamo: Archaeology of the Screen / Interactivity / Immersion and the culture of attractions
• On the Archaeology of Imaginary Media

Suggested Reading:
On-line:
— Siegfried Zielinski, Media Archaeology, ctheory Special Issues: ga111, Date Published: 7/11/1996. http://www.ctheory.net/articles.aspx?id=42
— Eric Kluitenberg, Connection Machines (from: E. Kluitenberg (ed.) The Book of Imaginary Media, NAi Publishers, 2006) available online: http://noemalab.eu/ideas/essay/connection-machines/

Books:
— Siegfried Zielinski, Deep Time of the Media – Toward an Archaeology of hearing and Seeing by Technical Means, MIT Press, 2006.
— Jussi Parikka, What is Media Archaeology?, Polity Press, New York, 2012. http://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745650258
— Erkki Huhtamo & Jussi Parikka, Media Archaeology: Approaches, Applications, Implications, University of California Press, Santa Barbera, 2011 – Introduction chapter available online: http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520262744
— Friederich Kittler, Gramophone, Film, Typewriter, Brinkman & Bose, Berlin, 1986 (Engl. Translation, Stanford University Press, 1999).
— Zielinski, et. all, The Variantology book series – ‘Deep Time Explorations in the Arts and Sciences’: http://variantology.com/?lang=en

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Movement Matters
Cocky Eek, Renske Maria van Dam
Mandatory for: free choice

The anthropogenic ubiquity of immanent change and movement seems to exceed present cognitive and sensitive abilities of our species and with that changes the relation between people and environment. Where in western discourse space is understood as the empty distance between two objects, space in eastern discourse is understood as a charged field, a dynamic spatiotemporal interval with a focus on performance.  MOVEMENT MATTERS  is a hands-on course in which we explore this dynamic space-time interval through body-matter experiments inspired by ancient Japanese (animism) as well as contemporary European philosophy (new materialism). We do not move through space but space moves through us.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


MyFirst3D: Scanning, Modeling and Printing
Yvo van Os
Mandatory for: free choice

This course is an introduction in the world of 3D-scanning, -modeling and -printing. The first day you will have a general introduction in the 3D lab. The course will focus on 3D printing: you will learn different 3D scan techniques as well as the basics of 3D-modelling and sculpting. The available 3D printing techniques at KABK will be explained as well as the design guidelines for 3D printing.  You will finish the week with your first 3D-printed object.
Note: 3D printing material at own costs.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


New Arts & Music Theory
KC: SON15
Michael van Hoogenhuyze, Peter Adriaansz, Eric Kluitenberg, Gabriel Payuk & guests
Mandatory for: B1 (AS/Son/Com collaboration)

This course is offered to all first-year students of ArtScience, Composition and Sonology. It provides a cross-disciplinary exploration of recent ideas, practices and techniques in music and related arts: verbal, visual, theatrical, and much else. New forms of creative practice and new platforms for its presentation are investigated, ranging from the conventional concert hall to the alternative spaces of galleries, installations, site-specific composition, the internet, etc. The relationship and the “fit” between new forms of thought and new forms of presentation will be a recurring topic throughout the course, as will the challenge of writing about such new media in the face of an evolving and still-developing critical language that attempts to avoid irrelevant criteria from past art forms.

Credits: 3 EC
No. of classes: Approx 30 classes of 2 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Professional Practice Preparation
Klaus jung, Taconis Stolk (eds.) & guests
Mandatory for: B3 (AS/FA collaboration)

A week into reality: in the morning, lectures and discussions with people from the world after graduation — professional artists from different disciplines, gallerists, festival programmers and more. In the afternoon, workshops about all the practicalities you will face s an artist in the real world. A collaboration with the Fine Arts department of the KABK.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Project Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: free choiceprpr-smallThe project projection course is aimed at students who are planning to use some form of projection in their work. Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. In this very hands-on and practical course we’ll explore these aspects considering the projects or ideas that the students bring in individually.

We ‘ll explore how different technical resources are best put to use and what impact that could have on the experience of the work. This might result in some radical alternatives to the original plan!  We‘ll try out and test a lot so that a high level of precision can be reached.  Hopefully in this way we’ll put the original ideas into an enriched perspective.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Quick & Dirty
Cocky Eek
Mandatory for: B1

In this course you will be dipped in a method of the making process. The making process by its own nature, offers many surprising, irrational, accidental possibilities that the mind simply cannot predict or imagine.
The class will explore this creative process as a dialogue between maker and matter in diverse mediated forms, in which matter can be interpreted broadly, but which is always the available reality that is transformed in the making process. We’ll do quick hands-on experiments and dirty prototyping, with the aim to train our skills of perception, to learn to recognize when/where things get interesting, and to tap in the enormous potential that comes by working open-ended.
You will work on an individual base as well in a group process and documentation/recording can be helpful tool in the making process.
No Matter – Try Again – Fail Again – Fail Better, Samuel Beckett

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Redeconstruct Media
Kasper van der Horst, Nenad Popov
Mandatory for: free choice

In a number of steps, we aim to look a bit into the phenomena of fragmented media. In our case, media can be only available in fragments, or media that are fragmented for an artistic reason. During the course, we like to look at media in the broadest (metamedia) sense, for example text, literature, data, dna, images, pixels, artworks, audio and video can be your point of interest.  We’ll look into the art of abbreviation as well as into more or less speculative reconstruction methods of media. ( veracious or manupilative : redeconstruct )

Our objective is to design individual systems to do this, and because we can also design these systems in an artistic way, that is where we will focus on.  Some participants will stay in the analogue domain, while others might find algorithmic solutions to work with.  After the first steps of exploring we take our time to develop a very personal point of view for each individual student’s perspective. At the end of this two week’s course we ‘ll ask you to present your system in the format of a work or to present a conclusion of how your system works.

 

keywords:
•context recreation •artificial consequence •context recreation algorthms/systems
•fragmented sources/media/content •construct new truths •cloudlike media presence •reconstruct media •redeconstruct media

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


RecPlay
Robert Pravda, Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: free choice

Since 2001, RecPlay is the ArtScience improvisation ensemble. Some of the research topics that are adressed in the RecPlay are multi-player interfaces, improvisation structures, noise art, feedback in image and sound, realtime composition systems, spatial compositions and interaction with architectural elements. Its practical focus will be on developing improvisations and compositions and on developing ensemble playing using unconventionall instruments.
For a number of years, students have participated in this live electronica and mechanica improvisation group initiated by Robert Pravda. It has had regular performances in various well- known as well as obscure venues, for instance in places like Vooruit, Gent, Zeebelt, Den Haag, Worm, Rotterdam, TodaysArt festival and EXIS, Den Haag, RADIO West, STRP festival Eindhoven, Korzo, Den Haag, Transmediale, Berlin and many more.

Credits: 4 EC (first semester) + 4 EC (second semester)
No. of classes: Appr 20 sess of 2.5 hrs, presentations
Examination: Presentations, written research report, attendance


Sensors, Microcontrollers and Actuators
Lex van den Broek
Mandatory for: free choice

This course is a continuation of the Introduction to Electronics that is given in the first year. It is open to other students who have at least some familiarity with the most basic concepts of electronics. In this course students learn how to understand and build simple setups consisting of a sensor, a controller and an actuator. The concepts behind controllers like the ipsonlab and the Arduino or Wiring board are introduced. The most common types of sensors are introduced and how to connect them and interpret the data they produce. Also the most common actuators will be introduced.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: assignments, attendance


Sonic Transformations in Sound Installations and Performance Art
Cathy van Eck
Mandatory for: free choice

In this workshop, we explore how sound changes our perspective of what we see and hear. Everyday actions or objects can be modified completely by transforming their sound or adding sounds that seem to be not connoted to the action or object. We will not only look (and listen!) for these kinds of transformations but also compose small sound installations and short performances with them. The whole process of sound creation and diffusion will be captured and modified with different tools, such as microphones, audio processing softwares, loudspeakers, and sensor systems. We will focus on an approach of using lo-fi equipment and manipulating and tweaking the devices according to our needs. As a result we aim for obtaining new ideas and possibilities of using sound in our own works.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Sound Matter
Benny Nilsen
Mandatory for: free choice

An introductory field-recording workshop exploring materiality and location.
Brief history and introduction to sound art leading up to contemporary practitioners.
Following an introduction of the artist’s own practice and listing examples from key figures of  musique concrete and sound recording, we will explore the creation of concepts based on sound, the use of field recordings and sound, work on basic editing skills and processing, as well as modes for presentation.
Students are encouraged to present a work (in progress) at the end of the workshop.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


SoundWorlds
Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of working with sound, to teach the handling of basic recording and studio equipment and to offer basic insight in general music theory. Also a short introduction will be given to the history of electro-acoustic music and basic concepts of composition.
The theoretical part will cover:
– Basic parameters of sound, such as the concepts of sound as change of pressure through the air, waveform and harmonic spectrum of the sound, wavelength, amplitude, frequency and perception of pitch and loudness. Also we will discuss the basics of analog sound, digital sound, synthesis basics (additive, subtractive synthesis, Frequency modulation) and MIDI.
– An introduction to the basics of musical dramaturgy, or “how to organise sound” – historical overview, explaining & exploring different musical tools and their practical use, demystification of the so called “classical music” world, with the goal of expanding the palette of means that can be used in artistic work which includes sound/music.
On the practical side an introduction will be given to basic studio hardware and software, such as the mixing desk, amplifiers, speakers, cables and types of microphones and their uses use: XY, AB, MS, Binaural. We will talk about recording, sampling, editing, sound effects and various software and plugins.
During the course we will listen to pieces from important composers and discuss them. We will discuss examples of noise music, musique concrète, soundscapes, electronic music, sound- plays and field-recordings, but also other types of music in order to see how musical systems work.
All the students attending the course are expected to finish a number of exercises in listening, recording and editing. At the end of the course each student is asked to produce a composition in sound.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Space and Moon-Mars Exploration Through Art
Frederik de Wilde, Bernard Foing
Mandatory for: free choice

Space and Moon-Mars Exploration Through Art offers you a dream ticket to the technical heart of ESA, the European Space Agency. Located in Noordwijk (25 kilometres from the Hague), the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) is the incubator of the European space effort – where most ESA projects are born and where they are guided through the various phases of development.
Our guide at ESTEC is Bernard Foing, Executive Director of the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) and Principal Project Scientist for SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon. He will introduce you to the main activities at ESTEC: scientific research, exploration, telecommunications, human spaceflight, satellite navigation and Earth observation.

Depending on the profile of your project, you can receive guidance from space scientists and engineers, access a wealth of data collected during various space missions, and invent your own way of fostering a collaboration with ESTEC. You will be further assisted by Frederik de Wilde in developing your final project for this course. Part of the classes will take place at ESTEC.

Since the earliest scientific preparations for extraterrestrial travel at the beginning of the 20th century, the exploration of outer space has become a quintessential framework of the human condition and its creative manifestations. Although the artistic pursuit of space science is sill in its infancy, an accelerated evolution is currently underway.

Keywords: Moon Village, Mars Journey, harsh habitats, sensory deprivation and psychological effects of space travel, overview effect, microgravity, immersive environments, origins of life, climate and space weather, astrobiology, nanotechnology, robotics, remote and machine sensing, Solar System, humans as extraterrestrial villagers.

Opportunities: participation to workshop , definition of follow up artsciene and space projects, residency, contribution to TodaysArt Sept 2017.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: approx. 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Spectra – Space as an Organism
Andrea Božić, Julia Willms
Mandatory for: free choice (AS/Son/Com Exchange Workshop)

In this in-disciplinary workshop we will approach space as performative and as an organism. We will depart from the notion that there is no such thing as empty space or a position outside of space, that we are not in the space but we are space. We will collect dreams and map them into space, weave them into new spatial narratives, allowing their logic to reorganise the logic of the actual space. We will explore a combined movement of sound, light, body, image and text as part of the choreography of gaze and attention merging physical, cinematic, theatrical, digital, architectural, virtual and imagined aspects of space. The workshop will include the practice of divided attention. The workshop is part of our long-term project Spectra – space as an organism, where we work with the whole space and the visitor’s presence in it as part of the work. It is also part of the research for The Passage, a performance that passes through a theatre or another location in collaboration with the weather and the city.
Keywords: porous space, perforated space, performative space, performance as a passage, divided attention, space as an organism, in-disciplinary.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Studium Generale
Hanne Hagenaars (ed.) & guests
Mandatory for: B2 (KABK organised)

The Studium Generale offers a nearly weekly programme of lectures of very different nature, based around a yearly central theme. Mandatory for second year Bachelors, but highly recommended for all other years of the Bachelors and Masters!

Credits: 1 EC
No. of classes: approx 30 lectures of 1.5 hrs
Examination: Attendance


The ‘Other’ Senses. Smell, touch, taste and proprioception in art, education and science
Caro Verbeek
Mandatory for: B1

The senses of  smell, taste, touch and proprioception are powerful tools for engaging an audience in an intimate and often interactive way. They require little knowledge and they are strong inducers of vivid memories.
Whereas sound and vision always gained a lot of academic attention, the so called ‘lower’ senses only recently (re-)entered the artistic debate. The ArtScience Interfaculty, formerly known as the Institute for Image and Sound, underlines the importance of those other senses that go beyond our traditional occularcentric approach.
This course is about creating awareness and understanding of the role of the ‘other’ senses – smell, touch and taste – in (history of) art, education and science.
For they are not as divided as we assume, the correlation between the senses will also be addressed (synaesthesia).
Due to their animalistic nature important thinkers like Plato, and later on Kant and Hegel excluded the lower senses from the aesthetic debate. As a counter-reaction famous artists like Marinetti and Duchamp and composers such as Scriabin incorporated olfactory and tactile dimensions to their work. Unfortunately this quite volatile heritage was partially lost due to its fleeting nature and the impossibility of registering and preserving smells, tastes and tactile experiences. Museums and other institutes that address vision, have always been primed to collect and conserve. That is why many tactile and olfactory works of art never made it into written history. Anthropologists, art historians and other academics are now working on a reconstruction.
During classes students will encounter sensory art historical reconstructions to stimulate debate on the senses and as an inspiration to create small olfactory and tactile compositions. A colour-smell synaesthesia test will be executed on the first and the last day of the course.
Furthermore there will be a linguistic translation of a Futurist tactile poem, and an olfactory-musical recital composed by Scriabin.

Topics
– Synaesthesia of the lower senses.
– Touch: the Deepest Sense. On the role of touch in history of art and culture.
– The Gesamtkunstwerk. The merging of the senses.
– Kinaesthesia and Proprioception.
– Sensory Memories
– Gustation in (history) of art and Wine Tasting.
– Surrealist Exhibition Design: a matter of deranging the senses
– On the Taboo: Body Odours and Forbidden Touch in Installations and performances
– Olfactory Communication in science and marketing
– Inhaling History of Art: on the Role of Olfaction in History of Art
– Scent Diffusing Techniques

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: reading and discussing of articles, small written assignments and presentations (like creating a non-visual narrative), active participation in debates


Thinking Three Cultures. Art, Science and Society
Frank Theys
Mandatory for: B2

The course is a study of a number of parallels between the philosophy of art and the philosophy of science and technology throughout modern history. The former has been influenced by the latter, which is not strange when art and science philosophers were often part of the same ideological school and in some cases united within one and the same person. Tracing back some of these influences will give us a better understanding of these art theories.
Our modern society is based on the split between the natural and the social sciences, which goes back to the time of Descartes and Francis Bacon. For the natural sciences to claim objectivity on its search for the laws of nature, they had to take distance from all political, ethical and religious involvements. For the study of these other, social matters a second academic bloc was created: the social sciences. This segregation between the two scientific blocs has increased in the science philosophy of the 20th century and has been subject for debate, known as the discussion about ‘the two cultures’. However, this ‘split-thinking’ is now put under pressure: modern technology is increasingly becoming the center of ethical debates, often triggered by the convergence of biotechnology, information science and nanotechnology. The natural sciences are pushed to make a stand on their social relevance and social responsibility.
It is the premise of this course that the segregation discourse within science philosophy has influenced art theories in their own claims for independence and artistic essence. In other words the debate on ‘the two cultures’ has forced the creation of ‘a third culture’ – the one of art (“art is about art”). But, just as the natural sciences, art is now confronted with a similar question of social relevance/responsibility in populist, neoliberal, as well as in critical thinking on art. In this course we try to trace this parallel between the pressure on the natural sciences and the pressure on art to find answers on the position of art today.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


This One Movement (Leading Up to an Explosion)
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: free choice (AS/Son/Com Exchange Workshop)

The theatre space provides ideal circumstances to control angles and positions from which the audience observes or views the material presented. Very much like the current, popular understanding of the “diorama”
In a diorama, where time (or life) is put to standstill, the audience has the possibility to closely observe the scenes presented and take notice of the smallest detail. The word “diorama” originated as a type of picture-viewing device, and as such provides us with another association that is of particular interest to us:
If applied well, the single-eye view of a diorama offers no distraction by the binocular perception of depth.
The ‘blackness’ of the theatre and it’s controlled view allows the performer or performance to be staged as a two-dimensional event, offering no distraction and allowing the audience to focus entirely on the action in front of them. The development of stage-material in this project is entirely based around this notion of controlled viewing.

One movement.
By zooming in on one particular action or movement, almost bringing it to a standstill, we can highlight it’s features, revealing particular artifacts that are usually obscured by longer sequences or events. As if it were an object or event placed in diorama, the developed movement is extended and stretched, testing it in various circumstances. Bearing in mind the focus and concentration of our audience, we have to repeat movement as to abstract it, dislodge it from associations, making possible the emergence of new associations and search for qualities within the movement.

Note: will include Saturday and Sunday following the week — for presentations in the theatre.

Credits: 2 EC
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hrs plus preparations/performances in the weekend
Examination: Process and performance


What Is Science: Cognitive Dissonance – Theory and Practice
Arthur Elsenaar
Mandatory for: free choice

In psychology, cognitive dissonance is the mental stress or discomfort experienced by an individual who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time, performs an action that is contradictory to one or more beliefs, ideas, or values, or is confronted by new information that conflicts with existing beliefs, ideas, or values.

This two week practice-based course is exploring Leon Festinger’s classic cognitive dissonance theory. We learn what this theory is about and how to effectively deploy it in artistic practice with the aim to maximize the impact of the artwork on the recipient. Be(come) psyched!?

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance


Writing as/in Research
Maya Rasker
Mandatory for: M1

To write, means to allow ideas, notions, knowledge, nonsense to come into being – which is a good reason why so many fear the act of writing: once written, your thoughts become a reality of their own. During the workshop Writing as / in Research we will investigate what writing means – as an act of unravelling and discovering of the mind’s working, rather than to fixate embryonal cerebral thinking (that often should not see the light of day – yet).
Point of departure is you – a creative creature that oscillates between who you are, what you do, and where you are heading. Through a sytematic analysis of the creative process you will discover how different writing techniques support and enhance your personal search for artistic growth – no matter your medium or main artistic interest.
Language is our material, so the course encompasses lots of writing, reading, listening and taking notes. The use of pen, or pencil, and paper is obligatory. No laptops allowed in the classroom.

Credits: 4 EC
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hrs
Examination: Assignments, attendance